GINGER MISO BROTH with SOBA and SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS [recipe]

ginger miso broth soba noodles shiitake mushrooms
The most important part of this recipe is the Ginger Miso Broth, which you will make and sip and eat all the time in so many different ways. Because it’s January, because it’s the new year, because the weather is beyond ice cold (even here in LA, where it’s not literally freezing, but for us, it’s kinda freezing), the Ginger Miso Broth is the base for a health-supporting bowl of green tea soba noodles, grilled shiitake mushrooms, broccolini, and soft-boiled eggs.

Recipe for GINGER MISO BROTH with SOBA and SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS first, my personal notes and shopping resources follow.

GINGER MISO BROTH with SOBA and SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS [recipe]

serves 2

INGREDIENTS

for Ginger Miso Broth

5 cups filtered water
1 2-inch piece of ginger, grated (into about 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger)
2 tablespoons shiro (white) miso

for Ginger Miso Soba Bowls

4 ounces soba noodles
4 large shiitake mushrooms, sliced and sauteed
4-5 stalks of broccolini or broccoli florets, cooked
2 eggs, soft-boiled
4 cups Ginger Miso Broth
to garnish (all optional): sliced scallions, fresh sprouts, toasted sesame seeds, a drizzle of toasted sesame oil

DIRECTIONS

Make Ginger Miso Broth:

In a pot, bring water and minced ginger to a boil, then turn down heat and simmer for about 10 minutes.

Place the miso in a small, heat-proof bowl. Add about 2 tablespoons of the hot water from the pot into the miso and stir until the miso is “dissolved.” It will not actually dissolve, just loosen into a slurry. Pour the miso water back into the pot and stir. Taste for salt. Stir in additional miso a half tablespoon at a time until desired saltiness.

Assemble Ginger Miso Soba Bowls:

Cook soba noodles according to package directions.

For each bowl, place half the soba noodles in the bottom of the bowl. Add the sauteed shiitake mushrooms and broccolini. Stir the Ginger Miso Broth, then ladle 1 to 1½ cups of Ginger Miso Broth into each bowl. Add soft boiled eggs, sliced scallions, fresh sprouts, and any other additional toppings and/or garnishes.

Serve immediately.

Leftovers can be kept in the refrigerator for up to two days if each of the components — Ginger Miso broth, soba noodles, cooked toppings — are wrapped and sealed separately.

green market haul for shakshuka

NOTES and RESOURCES

  • MISO: There are different kinds of miso, ranging in flavor from light and sweet to darker and more intense/funky. I use an organic shiro miso, which is a mild, yellowish/white miso. Miso is available in almost all Asian markets. I have seen miso in all of the Whole Foods Markets near me (I am in Los Angeles). [organic shiro miso here]
  • Miso is made from soybeans, so if you are doing a detox that excludes soy products (edamame, tofu, soy sauce, tamari), miso is part of that.
  • GINGER: If you are sensitive to ginger, you can leave it out completely, defeating the purpose of a GINGER miso broth, or you can simply strain the minced ginger out of the water after simmering and before adding the miso.
  • SOBA NOODLES: I used “cha soba,” green tea soba, noodles in this version for their color and slightly bitter flavor. You can use any type of soba noodles, and in fact, any type of noodle that will hold up in flavor and texture against earthy miso. [organic green tea soba noodles here]
  • GLUTEN-FREE: Soba noodles are made from buckwheat, which is gluten-free, but most of the time, soba noodles are made with some percentage of regular wheat flour for texture. If you want to make this bowl gluten-free, look for 100% buckwheat soba noodles. They are harder to find, but do exist. One note: gluten-free soba noodles do not hold up very long in a broth, so serve and eat right away. Leftovers of 100% buckwheat soba noodles do not keep well.
  • VEGETABLES: I used grilled shiitake mushrooms and broccolini for their health-supporting benefits for my specific health concerns (vitamin D, anti-inflammatory). However, this bowl tastes great with any kind of cooked vegetables like zucchini, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, carrots, and kale and any of its green leafy cousins.
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